Life in These Hawaiian Islands

Trade Winds, Tsunamis, and the Coconut Wireless


Leave a comment

Filipino Cuisine: Agar-Agar Fruit Cocktail Dessert

FILIPINO CUISINE: AGAR-AGAR FRUIT COCKTAIL DESSERT      Rate ThisFor dessert, Linda made a Agar-Agar Fruit Cocktail Dessert.  Most of the ingredients are ready for use in a jar or can except the Agar-Agar which has to be prepared.The Agar-Agar Fruit Cocktail Dessert is quick and easy to make as most of the ingredients can be stocked in the pantry. This dessert is versatile as you can used various can fruits of your preference.Ingredients2 tablespoons agar-agar powder1/2 cup granulated sugar4 cups water1 cup 2% milk1 teaspoon flavoring extract like almond, coconut, lychee etc1 jar (12 ounce) young coconut string, drained1 large can (796ml) fruit cocktail, drained1 small can (6 ounce) of thick creamSource: LindaPrep time: 30 minutes;  Serves 8 to 10InstructionsCombine sugar, agar-agar powder, flavoring extract, milk and water in a medium sauce pan. You may used the liquid from the fruit cocktail (as part of the water) to sweeten the agar-agar and reduce the sugar from this recipe.Cook on medium heat with constant stirring until it comes to a boil.Pour the slightly thicken agar-agar mixture into a baking pan and let it cool in a cold water bath. The agar-agar will solidify when it cools.Linda demonstrated to us a cool trick to cut up the agar-agar. She uses a lemon zester to scrape the agar-agar into long strips that resemble noodles or young coconut strings.If you dont have young coconut strings in your pantry, you can flavored the agar-agar with coconut extract and it will look and taste like young coconut strings.Combine the drained fruit cocktail, young coconut strings and agar-agar in a large bowl.Add a can of thick cream.Mix well and chill before serving.Linda, thank you so much for sharing your Filipino heritage with us.

via Filipino Cuisine: Agar-Agar Fruit Cocktail Dessert.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Candida

http://kylejnorton.blogspot.ca/2015/03/the-research-paper-of-reader-guide-to_10.html

Tuesday, 10 March 2015
The research paper of Reader Guide To Cure Candidiasis: Some life threatening implications of candida overgrowth

By Kyle J. Norton Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it’s news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada – Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.

What is Candida Albicans
Candida albicans is a member of a large group of micro organism whose cells contain complex structures enclosed within the membranes, including yeast(2)(3), fungi(4)(5)(6), and mold(6) that live among the gut flora in the human mouth and gastrointestinal tract. In fact, under normal circumstances, Candida albicans that does not cause harmful effects, but overgrowth results in candidiasis. Non-albicans Candida (NAC) species cause 35-65% of all candidaemias in the general patient population(1). According to joint study, in many cases, biofilm(microorganisms with cells stick to each other on a surface) formation(7) gene mutations(8) and overexpression of genes(9)(10) are often associated with increased Candida resistance toward antifungal agents.

Candida albicans consequences
Some life threatening implication of candida overgrowth
1. Toxic shock syndrome(TSS)
Candida overgrowth can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS)(157), a potentially fatal illness by producing toxins to suppress the immune system(158)(159), leading to infection cause of high fever, accompanied by confusion, extreme fatigue and weakness, headache, severe diarrhea, sore throat, vomiting, widespread red rash, coma(161), and multiple organ failure(160).

2. Scalded skin syndrome (SSS)
Scalded skin syndrome is defined as a condition of skin infection caused of damage to the skin with marked shedding due to toxins(162) released by candida in suppressing the immune system(162). Depending its severity, it can causes bloodstream infection(163) and electrolyte imbalance, involved in regulate myocardial and neurological function(164), fluid balance(165), oxygen delivery, etc., resulting in high morbidity and mortality(166).

3. Candida and chronic diseases
a. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)(167)(168)
As the condition worsen, candida takes advantage of weakness immune system and imbalances in the digestive system, allowing fungus to overrun the digestive tracts(169), leading to gases which irritate the intestinal and stomach linings(171) cause of pain(170)(172).

b. Chronic Sinusitis(173)
As candida growth occurs in the sinus cavities(173), it causes fungal serious infections, with symptoms of nasal congestion, facial pain, pressure, congestion, or fullness, reduced or absent sense of smell. Both chronic and acute fungal sinusitis require immediate treatment(174).

c. Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic condition that causes intense pain in various places around the body, including muscles, connective tissues and joints, as well as a host of other symptoms, as a result of production of mycotoxins by overgrowth candida(175), causing autoimmune diseases(143)(144)(136) by triggering inflammation in the intestinal tract(151). Fibromyalgia syndrome affects more than 6 million people in the United States.

d. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is defined as a health condition of persistent fatigue unrelated to exertion, it interferes with the patient daily activity, causing trouble staying on top of their responsibilities at home and on the job, etc.(176) due to production of mycotoxins by overgrowth candida(177)(178), triggering inflammation(179) in the intestinal tract. Symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome include headache, tender lymph nodes, fatigue, weakness, muscle, joint aches, inability to concentrate,(180) etc.

e. Thrush
Thrush is defined as condition of infection of the mouth caused by over growth candida fungus(181)(182).

f. Eczema, or Atopic Dermatitis
Eczema is a general term for many types of skin inflammation (dermatitis). The most common form of eczema is atopic dermatitis in some case caused by over growth of candida(183)(184) as a result of immune suppressive factors(185).

g. Etc.
Super foods Library, Eat Yourself Healthy With The Best of the Best Nature Has to Offer

Back to home page http://kylejnorton.blogspot.ca/

References
(1) Non-albicans Candida spp. causing fungaemia: pathogenicity and antifungal resistance by Krcmery V1, Barnes AJ.(PubMed)
(2) Pathogenicity and drug resistance in Candida albicans and other yeast species. A review by Mishra NN1, Prasad T, Sharma N, Payasi A, Prasad R, Gupta DK, Singh R.(PubMed)
(3) Multidrug resistance in yeast Candida by Prasad R1, Kapoor K.(PubMerd)
(4) New evidence that Candida albicans possesses additional ATP-binding cassette MDR-like genes: implications for antifungal azole resistance. by Walsh TJ1, Kasai M, Francesconi A, Landsman D, Chanock SJ.(PubMed)
(5) Mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungal agents in Candida albicans isolates from AIDS patients involve specific multidrug transporters.by Sanglard D1, Kuchler K, Ischer F, Pagani JL, Monod M, Bille J.(PubMed)
(6) Structural analysis of phospho-D-mannan-protein complexes isolated from yeast and mold form cells of Candida albicans NIH A-207 serotype A strain by Shibata N1, Fukasawa S, Kobayashi H, Tojo M, Yonezu T, Ambo A, Ohkubo Y, Suzuki S.(PubMed)
(7) The effect of antifungal combination on transcripts of a subset of drug-resistance genes in clinical isolates of Candida species induced biofilms by Ibrahim NH1, Melake NA2, Somily AM3, Zakaria AS4, Baddour MM5, Mahmoud AZ6(PubMed)
(8) Antifungal drug resistance in pathogenic fungi. by Vanden Bossche H1, Dromer F, Improvisi I, Lozano-Chiu M, Rex JH, Sanglard D.(PubMed)
(9) The genetic basis of fluconazole resistance development in Candida albicans by Morschhäuser J1.(PubMed)
(10) A proteomic approach to understanding the development of multidrug-resistant Candida albicans strains by Kusch H1, Biswas K, Schwanfelder S, Engelmann S, Rogers PD, Hecker M, Morschhäuser J.(PubMed)
(157)Effect of strain of Staphylococcus aureus on synergism with Candida albicans resulting in mouse mortality and morbidity. Carlson E.(PubMed)
(158)Lesson of the month 2: toxic shock syndrome.
Shalaby T1, Anandappa S2, Pocock NJ2, Keough A2, Turner A2.(PubMed)
(159)Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome: superantigen-mediated enhancement of endotoxin shock and adaptive immune suppression. Kulhankova K1, King J, Salgado-Pabón W.(PubMed)
(160) Toxic Shock Syndrome, C health
(161)Group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome with extremely aggressive course in the third trimester. Sugiyama T1, Kobayashi T, Nagao K, Hatada T, Wada H, Sagawa N.(PubMed).
(162) Scalded skin syndrome, the university of Maryland medical center
(163)Candida bloodstream infections in intensive care units: analysis of the extended prevalence of infection in intensive care unit study. Kett DH1, Azoulay E, Echeverria PM, Vincent JL; Extended Prevalence of Infection in ICU Study (EPIC II) Group of Investigators.(PubMed)
(164) [Infectious and metabolic nervous system complications of systemic cancer].[Article in Spanish]Ortiz N1.(PubMed)
(165) [Voriconazole compromises renal function in an elderly CDK patient with Candida albicans infection].[Article in Italian] Anastasio P1,.(PubMed)
(166)Endogenous thrombospondin-1 regulates leukocyte recr Marcarelli F, Bilancio G, Mele AA, De Santo NGuitment and activation and accelerates death from systemic candidiasis. Martin-Manso G1, Navarathna DH, Galli S, Soto-Pantoja DR, Kuznetsova SA, Tsokos M, Roberts DD.(PubMed)
(167) [Life-threatening complications of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis: a systematic analysis of admissions to an ICU during 18 years]. [Article in German] Huber W1, Herrmann G, Schuster T, Phillip V, Saugel B, Schultheiss C, Hoellthaler J, Gaa J, Hartel M, Schmid RM, Reindl W.(PubMed)
(168)The role of Candida albicans in the pathogenesis of food-intolerant irritable bowel syndrome. Shepherd C.(PubMed)
(169) Yeasts in the gut: from commensals to infectious agents. Schulze J1, Sonnenborn U.(PubMed)
(170) Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome. Vanuytsel T1, Tack JF, Boeckxstaens GE.(PubMed)
(171) Current gut-directed therapies for irritable bowel syndrome. Chang HY1, Kelly EC, Lembo AJ.(PubMed)
(172) Abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a review of putative psychological, neural and neuro-immune mechanisms.Elsenbruch S1.(PubMed)
(173) [Changes of etiology of chronic sinusitis].[Article in Chinese] Deng Q1, Peng P.(PubMed)
(174)Invasive fungal sinusitis of the sphenoid sinus. Lee DH1, Yoon TM1, Lee JK1, Joo YE2, Park KH3, Lim SC1.(PubMed)
(175) Occurrence of killer yeasts in isolates of clinical origin. Robledo-Leal E1, Villarreal-Treviño L, González GM.(PubMed)
(176)Experiences of daily activity in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) and their implications for rehabilitation programmes. Pemberton S1, Cox DL.(PubMed)
(177) Chronic illness associated with mold and mycotoxins: is naso-sinus fungal biofilm the culprit? Brewer JH1, Thrasher JD, Hooper D.(PubMed)
(178) Detection of mycotoxins in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.Brewer JH1, Thrasher JD, Straus DC, Madison RA, Hooper D.(PubMed)
(179) Exposure to zearalenone mycotoxin alters in vitro porcine intestinal epithelial cells by differential gene expression.Taranu I1, Braicu C2, Marin DE3, Pistol GC3, Motiu M3, Balacescu L2, Beridan Neagoe I2, Burlacu R4.(PubMed)
(180)Therapeutic effects of oral NADH on the symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Forsyth LM1, Preuss HG, MacDowell AL, Chiazze L Jr, Birkmayer GD, Bellanti JA.(PubMed)
(181) Identification of Candida albicans genes induced during thrush offers insight into pathogenesis. Cheng S1, Clancy CJ, Checkley MA, Handfield M, Hillman JD, Progulske-Fox A, Lewin AS, Fidel PL, Nguyen MH.(PubMed)
(182) Is endometrial infection with Candida albicans a cause of recurrent vaginal thrush?Smith JR1, Wells C, Jolly M, Shah P, Savage M, Reginald P, Kitchen VS.(PubMed)
(183) Candida albicans-specific lymphoproliferative and cytokine (IL-4 and IFN-gamma) responses in atopic eczema dermatitis syndrome. Evidence of CD4/CD8 and CD3/CD16+CD56 ratio elevations in vitro. Kosonen J1, Luhtala M, Viander M, Kalimo K, Terho EO, Savolainen J.(PubMed)
(184) Candida albicans mannan- and protein-induced humoral, cellular and cytokine responses in atopic dermatitis patients. Savolainen J1, Kosonen J, Lintu P, Viander M, Pène J, Kalimo K, Terho EO, Bousquet J.(PubMed)
(185) Guidelines for treatment of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) Part II.
Ring J1, Alomar A, Bieber T, Deleuran M, Fink-Wagner A, Gelmetti C, Gieler U, Lipozencic J, Luger T, Oranje AP, Schäfer T, Schwennesen T, Seidenari S, Simon D, Ständer S, Stingl G, Szalai S, Szepietowski JC, Taïeb A, Werfel T, Wollenberg A, Darsow U; European Dermatology Forum; European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology; European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis; European Federation of Allergy; European Society of Pediatric Dermatology; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network.(PubMed)
Posted by kyle J. Norton at 05:00

*****************************************************

http://kylejnorton.blogspot.ca/2015/03/the-holistic-approach-for-prevention_24.html

Tuesday, 24 March 2015
The Holistic approach for Prevention, controlling and Treatment – Chinese Herbs for restore balance of the body after treatment of Candida Albicans Overgrowth

By Kyle J. Norton Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it’s news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada – Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.

What is Candida Albicans
Candida albicans are members of a large group of micro organism whose cells contain complex structures enclosed within the membranes, including yeast(2)(3), fungi(4)(5)(6), and mold(6) that live among the gut flora in the human mouth and gastrointestinal tract. In fact, under normal circumstances, Candida albicans that do not cause harmful effects, but overgrowth result in candidiasis. Non-albicans Candida (NAC) species cause 35-65% of all candidaemias in the general patient population(1). According to joint study, in many cases, biofilm(microorganisms with cells stick to each other on a surface) formation(7) gene mutations(8) and overexpression of genes(9)(10) are often associated with increased Candida resistance toward antifungal agents.

Treatment

In Traditional Chinese Medicine

In traditional Chinese medicine, candidiasis is defined as a malfunction of the Triple Burner-related condition due to spleen and stomach disorder(401), causing excess fluid or phlegm in our system(402), weakening immune system(403)(402), leading to damp heat accumulates in the Lower, Middle and Upper Burner causes of candidiasis(401).

Tonifying herbs

After cleansing the body with the above herbs, repairing the damage and restoring the balance are vital to prevent the reoccurring of the pathological factors in TCM.

1. Ren Shen (Radix Ginseng)
Ren shen is aslo best known as Ginseng, a slow-growing plant, belonging to the Panax genus in the family Araliaceae. The smells aromatic, tastes sweet and slightly warm herb(541) has been used in TCM as anti cancer(542)(543), anti aging(544)(545) medicine and to enhance central nervous (546)(547), immune(548)(549), and circulatory system(549)(551) as it tonifies original qi, spleen, lungs and enhances the generation of body fluids by promoting the function of lung and spleen channels(541).
According to China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences formula ginseng-sanqi extract (GSE) showed to tonify qi and activating blood circulation in promoting endothelial proliferation(an increase in vascular endothelial cells needed for the growth of new or existing blood vessels) and angiogenesis( a process of growing new blood vessels form from pre-existing vessel), through enhancing the expression of angiogenesis signaling proteins (VEGFR-2, Ras, MAPK)(552).

2. Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae)
Bai zhu is also known as Bighead atractylodis rhizome, a genus Atractylodis, belonging to the family Asteraceae. The aromatic, acrid, and sweet herb(553) has been used in TCM as antioxidant(554)(555), to treat liver diseases(556), liver cancer(558)(559), Meniere’s disease(560), intestinal diseases(561), chronic back pain(562), acute infection of intestine(563) as it regulates the functions of liver and spleen, benefiting qi, and nourishing blood(557) by enhancing the functions of spleen and stomach channels(553).

3. Fu Ling (Sclerotium Poriae Cocos)
Fu ling is also known as Poria or china root, is a fungus in the genus Wolfiporia, belonging to family Polyporaceae. The sweet and neutral herb has been used in TCM as inflammatory(566)(567), diuretics(569)(570), anticancer(572)(573), antioxidant(573)(574) and anti-fungal and anti-bacterial(575)(571) agents, and to treat headache(568), cardiovascular diseases(576), neuro disorders(577) insomnia(578), loss of appetite(564) as it strengthens spleen and calms the mind by clearing away the stomach-heat, purging the heart fire, strengthening the spleen and tonifying the kidney(565) through enhancing the function of heart, spleen, lung, kidney channels(564).

4. Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae)
Chen Pi, also known as Tangerine Peel, is the skin of is an orange-coloured citrus fruit, belonging to the genus Citrus in the family Rutaceae. The bitter, acrid, warm herb has been used in TCM as antioxidant(580)(582), antimicrobial(579)(580)(581) and cytotoxic(580)(583) agents and to improve digestive functions(584), stop bleeding(585), increase blood pressure(585) and stimulate blood vessels(585) as it regulates qi and the middle burner, dry dampness and transform phlegm(586) by promoting the functions of lung and spleen channels(585).

5. Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae)
Ban xia is also known as Pinellia Tuber, a genus of Pinellia, belonging to the family Araceae and native to China. The acrid, warm, toxic herb(587)been used in TCM as anti nephritis(587)(592), anti cancer(589)(590), anti diabetic(591), anti hypercholesterol(592(598)), expectorant(593) and anti convulsant(594) agents and to facilitate gastric disorders(588), get rid of phlegm(597) and induce calming(596) as it dries dampness(587), and tonifies middle burner that aids digestion(595) by enhancing the functions of lung, spleen and stomach channels(587).
According to Nanjing University, banxia also exhibited anti microbial activities, including candida albicans, through its phytochemicial Pinelloside(596). crude extracts of 7 spcies, including sha ren

6. Sha Ren (Adenophora verticillata, Fisch)
Sha Ren is also known as cardamom seeds, the tree is belong to the genus Elettaria and Amomum in the family Zingiberaceae, native to in Asia and Australia. The acrid, warm and nontoxic(599) herb
has been used in TCM to treat digestive tract disorders(600)(601), such as bloating, stomach ache, nausea, vomiting and lack of appetite and gastric ulcer, as it transforms dampness(604), stimulate movement of qi and warms the middle burner(603) by promoting the functions of kidney, spleen and stomach channels(599).
According to University of Medical Sciences, showed effectively 100% inhibition of the pathogen mycelial growth, through it s anti fungal effects(602), in vitro.

7. Mu Xiang (Radix Aucklandiae)
Mu Xiang is also known as costus root, a genus is a genus Saussurea in the family Asteraceae, native to cool temperate helps to and arctic regions of Asia, Europe, and North America. The acrid, bitter and warm herb(605) has been used in TCM as anti microbial(606), anti diabetic(607) and, anti gastric ulcer(611) anti cancer(608)(609) agents and to treat digestive disorders(612), such as pain in the abdomen, diarrhea, vomiting caused by weak digestion, digestive tract infection(606) and yeast infection(606) as it enhances movement of qi, regulates the middle burner(612), dissolves damp-heat(610) by promoting the functions of gallbladder, large intestine, spleen, stomach channels(603).

+ References
(1) Non-albicans Candida spp. causing fungaemia: pathogenicity and antifungal resistance by Krcmery V1, Barnes AJ.(PubMed)
(2) Pathogenicity and drug resistance in Candida albicans and other yeast species. A review by Mishra NN1, Prasad T, Sharma N, Payasi A, Prasad R, Gupta DK, Singh R.(PubMed)
(3) Multidrug resistance in yeast Candida by Prasad R1, Kapoor K.(PubMerd)
(4) New evidence that Candida albicans possesses additional ATP-binding cassette MDR-like genes: implications for antifungal azole resistance. by Walsh TJ1, Kasai M, Francesconi A, Landsman D, Chanock SJ.(PubMed)
(5) Mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungal agents in Candida albicans isolates from AIDS patients involve specific multidrug transporters.by Sanglard D1, Kuchler K, Ischer F, Pagani JL, Monod M, Bille J.(PubMed)
(6) Structural analysis of phospho-D-mannan-protein complexes isolated from yeast and mold form cells of Candida albicans NIH A-207 serotype A strain by Shibata N1, Fukasawa S, Kobayashi H, Tojo M, Yonezu T, Ambo A, Ohkubo Y, Suzuki S.(PubMed)
(7) The effect of antifungal combination on transcripts of a subset of drug-resistance genes in clinical isolates of Candida species induced biofilms by Ibrahim NH1, Melake NA2, Somily AM3, Zakaria AS4, Baddour MM5, Mahmoud AZ6(PubMed)
(8) Antifungal drug resistance in pathogenic fungi. by Vanden Bossche H1, Dromer F, Improvisi I, Lozano-Chiu M, Rex JH, Sanglard D.(PubMed)
(9) The genetic basis of fluconazole resistance development in Candida albicans by Morschhäuser J1.(PubMed)
(10) A proteomic approach to understanding the development of multidrug-resistant Candida albicans strains by Kusch H1, Biswas K, Schwanfelder S, Engelmann S, Rogers PD, Hecker M, Morschhäuser J.(PubMed)
(541) Ren shen(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(542) Anti-proliferative effect of ginseng saponins on human prostate cancer cell line by Liu WK1, Xu SX, Che CT.(PubMed)
(543) Stereoisomer-Specific Anticancer Activities of Ginsenoside Rg3 and Rh2 in HepG2 Cells: Disparity in Cytotoxicity and Autophagy-Inducing Effects Due to 20(S)-Epimers by Cheong JH1, Kim H, Hong MJ, Yang MH, Kim JW, Yoo H, Yang H, Park JH, Sung SH, Kim HP, Kim J.(PubMed)
(544) Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging by Zhu J1, Mu X1, Zeng J2, Xu C1, Liu J1, Zhang M1, Li C1, Chen J3, Li T3, Wang Y1.(PubMed)
(545) Fermenting red ginseng enhances its safety and efficacy as a novel skin care anti-aging ingredient: in vitro and animal study by Lee HS1, Kim MR, Park Y, Park HJ, Chang UJ, Kim SY, Suh HJ.(PubMed)
(546) Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging by Zhu J1, Mu X1, Zeng J2, Xu C1, Liu J1, Zhang M1, Li C1, Chen J3, Li T3, Wang Y1.(PubMed)
(547) Neuroprotective effect of water extract of Panax ginseng on corticosterone-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and its underlying molecule mechanisms by Jiang Y1, Li Z1, Liu Y1, Liu X1, Chang Q1, Liao Y1, Pan R2.(PubMed)
(548) Immune system effects of echinacea, ginseng, and astragalus: a review by Block KI1, Mead MN.(PubMed)
(549) Ginseng, the ‘Immunity Boost’: The Effects of Panax ginseng on Immune System by Kang S1, Min H.(PubMed)
(550) A review on the medicinal potentials of ginseng and ginsenosides on cardiovascular diseases by Lee CH1, Kim JH2.(PubMed)
(551) Cardiovascular Diseases and Panax ginseng: A Review on Molecular Mechanisms and Medical Applications by Kim JH1.(PubMed)
(552) [Effect of ginseng-sanqi extract on the Ras associated signal proteins].[Article in Chinese] by Tian W1, Lei Y, Zhu LQ.(PubMed)
(553) Bai zhu(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(554) Antioxidant activity of qizhu tang by Wang XJ1, Feng P.(PubMed)
(555) Antioxidant potential of qizhu tang, a chinese herbal medicine, and the effect on cerebral oxidative damage after ischemia reperfusion in rats by Xuejiang W1, Ichikawa H, Konishi T.(PubMed)
(556) Compositions for protecting liver, or for preventing or treating liver fibrosis or cirrhosis US 20080260870 A1
(557) Investigation of the Chemical Changes from Crude and Processed Paeoniae Radix Alba-Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma Herbal Pair Extracts by Using Q Exactive High-Performance Benchtop Quadrupole-Orbitrap LC-MS/MS by Cao G1, Li Q2, Cai H3, Tu S4, Cai B1.(PubMed)
(558) Atractylenolide II induces G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in B16 melanoma cells byYe Y1, Wang H, Chu JH, Chou GX, Chen SB, Mo H, Fong WF, Yu ZL.(PubMed)
(559) Atractylenolide I-mediated Notch pathway inhibition attenuates gastric cancer stem cell traits by Ma L1, Mao R1, Shen K1, Zheng Y1, Li Y1, Liu J2, Ni L3.(PubMed)
(560) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine: A … By Bob Flaws, Philippe Sionneau, page 364
(561) Literature-based analysis on relationship of symptoms, drugs and therapies in treatment of intestinal diseases by Gao L, Wang J, Li F, Deng Y, Gao S.(PubMed)
(562) The Treatment of Modern Western Medical Diseases with Chinese Medicine: A … By Bob Flaws, Philippe Sionneau, page 346
(563) Fermented Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae alleviates high fat diet-induced obesity in association with regulation of intestinal permeability and microbiota in rats by Wang JH1, Bose S2, Kim HG3, Han KS3, Kim H3.(PubMed)
(564) Fu ling(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(565) Treatment of incipient diabetic nephropathy by clearing away the stomach-heat, purging the heart fire, strengthening the spleen and tonifying the kidney by Wu S1, Han Y, Li J.(PubMed)
(566) Ethanol extract of Poria cocos reduces the production of inflammatory mediators by suppressing the NF-kappaB signaling pathway in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by Jeong JW, Lee HH, Han MH, Kim GY, Hong SH, Park C, Choi YH1.(PubMed)
(567) Influence of traditional Chinese anti-inflammatory medicinal plants on leukocyte and platelet functions by Prieto JM1, Recio MC, Giner RM, Máñez S, Giner-Larza EM, Ríos JL.(PubMed)
(568) [Syndrome differentiation and treatment of Taiyang disease in Shanghan Lun].[Article in Chinese] by Yang X1, Peng WB, Yue XQ.(PubMed)
(569) Diuretic activity of some fractions of the epidermis of Poria cocos by Feng YL1, Lei P, Tian T, Yin L, Chen DQ, Chen H, Mei Q, Zhao YY, Lin RC.(PubMed)
(570) Diuretic activity of the ethanol and aqueous extracts of the surface layer of Poria cocos in rat by Zhao YY1, Feng YL, Du X, Xi ZH, Cheng XL, Wei F.(PubMed)
(571) Biological activities and potential health benefits of polysaccharides from Poria cocos and their derivatives by Sun Y1.(PubMed)
(572) Triterpenes from Poria cocos suppress growth and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells through the downregulation of MMP-7 by Cheng S1, Eliaz I, Lin J, Thyagarajan-Sahu A, Sliva D.(PubMed)
(573) Cytotoxic and anti-oxidant activities of lanostane-type triterpenes isolated from Poria cocos by Zhou L1, Zhang Y, Gapter LA, Ling H, Agarwal R, Ng KY.(PubMed)
(574) Antioxidant activity of carboxymethyl (1→3)-β-d-glucan (from the sclerotium of Poria cocos) sulfate (in vitro) by Wang Q1, Chen S2, Han L2, Lian M2, Wen Z2, Jiayinaguli T2, Liu L2, Sun R2, Cao Y3.(PubMed)
(575) Anti-fungal and anti-bacterial activities of ethanol extracts of selected traditional Chinese medicinal herbs by Zhang L1, Ravipati AS, Koyyalamudi SR, Jeong SC, Reddy N, Bartlett J, Smith PT, de la Cruz M, Monteiro MC, Melguizo A, Jiménez E, Vicente F.(PubMed)
(576) Bioactive proteins and peptides isolated from Chinese medicines with pharmaceutical potential. by Wong KL1, Wong RN2, Zhang L1, Liu WK3, Ng TB3, Shaw PC4, Kwok PC5, Lai YM6, Zhang ZJ1, Zhang Y1, Tong Y1, Cheung HP1, Lu J1, Sze SC1.(PubMed)
(577) A activitiesUse of Yokukansan (TJ-54) in the treatment of neurological disorders: a review by de Caires S1, Steenkamp V.(PubMed)
(578) Over-the-counter sleeping pills: a survey of use in Hong Kong and a review of their constituents by Chung KF1, Lee CK.(PubMed)
(579) Antimicrobial activity of acid-hydrolyzed Citrus unshiu peel extract in milk by Min KY1, Kim HJ2, Lee KA1, Kim KT3, Paik HD4.(PubMed)
(580) New depside from Citrus reticulata Blanco by Phetkul U1, Phongpaichit S, Watanapokasin R, Mahabusarakam W(PubMed)
(581) Anti-fungal activity of Citrus reticulata Blanco essential oil against Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum by Tao N1, Jia L2, Zhou H2.(PubMed)
(582) Phenolic compositions and antioxidant capacities of Chinese wild mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco) fruits by Zhang Y1, Sun Y, Xi W, Shen Y, Qiao L, Zhong L, Ye X, Zhou Z.(PubMed)
(583) Differential inhibition of human cancer cell proliferation by citrus limonoids by Tian Q1, Miller EG, Ahmad H, Tang L, Patil BS.(PubMed)
(584) EFFICACY OF CITRUS FRUIT PEEL EXTRACTS AGAINST PATHOGENS CAUSING GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS SRIVIDHYA. M1,2, RAMANATHAN. K2 AND KRISHNANAND. N.(International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences)
(585) Chen pi(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(586) Encyclopedic Reference of Traditional Chinese Medicine edited by Yang Xinrong, page 542
(587) Ban xia(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(588) Effect of Pinellia ternata tuber on the efferent activity of the gastric vagus nerve in the rat.
Niijima A1, Okui Y, Kubo M, Higuchi M, Taguchi H, Mitsuhashi H, Maruno M.(PubMed)
(589) Chinese medicine formula “Weikang Keli” induces autophagic cell death on human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 by Huo J1, Qin F, Cai X, Ju J, Hu C, Wang Z, Lu W, Wang X, Cao P.(PubMed)
(590) [Effects of ethanol extract of Rhizome Pinelliae Preparata on intracellular pH value of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells].[Article in Chinese]by Zhang CA1, Wu F, Mao ZJ, Wei Z, Li YJ, Wei PK.(PubMed)
(591) Anti-diabetic effect of Wen-pi-tang-Hab-Wu-ling-san extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Hyo Won Jung, Jin Ki Jung,1 Mahesh Ramalingam, Cheol-Ho Yoon,2 Hyo Sang Bae,2 and Yong-Ki Park (PubMed)
(592) Effects of chai ling tang on proteinuria in rat models by Li P1, Fujio S.(PubMed)
(593) [Effect of jinshui-liujun decoction on chronic bronchitis in rats].[Article in Chinese] by Shen Y1, Lü X, Jiang J, Guo S, Zhao C, Meng H, Li S, Hu X(PubMed)
(594) Sedative, hypnotic and anticonvulsant activities of the ethanol fraction from Rhizoma Pinelliae Praeparatum by Xiang-yang Wu, Jiang-li Zhao, Min Zhang, Fang Li, Ting Zhao, Liu-qing Yang [accessed Mar 22, 2015](Researchgate)
(595) 2008 VOLUME 3 ISSUE 1Australian Journalof Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine25Modern Applications ofModifiedBan Xia Xie Xin Tangand Their Development by Hong Xu, PhD and Wen Xuan Zhang, PhD
(596) Pinelloside, an antimicrobial cerebroside from Pinellia ternata byChen JH1, Cui GY, Liu JY, Tan RX.(PubMed)
(597) [Optimized treatment program for unstable angina by integrative medicine based on partially observable Markov decision process].[Article in Chinese]by Feng Y1, Xu H, Liu K, Zhou XZ, Chen KJ.(PubMed)
(598) Anti-obesity effect of Pinellia ternata extract in Zucker rats by Kim YJ1, Shin YO, Ha YW, Lee S, Oh JK, Kim YS.(PubMed)
(599) Sha ren(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(600) Gastroprotective effect of cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum Maton. fruits in rats by Jamal A1, Javed K, Aslam M, Jafri MA.(PubMed)
(601) Evaluation of the gastric antiulcerogenic effect of large cardamom (fruits of Amomum subulatum Roxb). by Jafri MA1, Farah, Javed K, Singh S.(PubMed)
(602) Anti-fungal activity of cold and hot water extracts of spices against fungal pathogens of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) in vitro by Touba EP1, Zakaria M, Tahereh E.(PubMed)
(603) Herbal Formulas II Dr. Li, Dongcheng
(604) Foundations for Integrative Musculoskeletal Medicine: An East-west Approach By Alon Marcus, page 104
(605) Mu xiang(Complementary and Alternative Healing University)
(606) Antibiotic principle of Eupatorium capillifolium by Rao KV, Alvarez FM.(PubMed)
(607)Normo-glycemic and hypolipidemic effect of costunolide isolated from Costus speciosus (Koen ex. Retz.)Sm. in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Eliza J1, Daisy P, Ignacimuthu S, Duraipandiyan V.(PubMed)
(608) [Effect of costus root oil in murine tumors].[Article in Japanese] by Takanami I, Ikeda Y, Nakayama H.(PubMed)
(609) [Cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity to costus root oil in lung cancer].[Article in Japanese] by Takanami I, Ishihara T, Yanai N(PubMed)
(610) [Observation of the curative effect of qingchang huashi recipe for treating active ulcerative colitis of inner-accumulation of damp-heat syndrome].[Article in Chinese] by He HH1, Shen H, Zheng K.(PubMed)
(611) [Study of the effect of exceed critical extracts from Radix Aucklandiae on experimental gastric ulcer model].[Article in Chinese] by Han J1, Lin H, Zhong Z, Rong X.(PubMed)
(612) Authentication of Radix Aucklandiae and its substitutes by GC-MS and hierarchical clustering analysis by Shum KC1, Chen F, Li SL, Wang J, But PP, Shaw PC.(PubMed)
(613) Radix Aucklandiae, TCM Wiki
Posted by kyle J. Norton at 04:18


Leave a comment

VATICAN EXORCISM COURSE DISTINGUISHES DEVILRY FROM PSYCHOLOGICAL ILLNESS

http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2015/04/03/vatican-exorcism-course-distinguishes-devilry-from-psychological-illness/

VATICAN EXORCISM COURSE DISTINGUISHES DEVILRY FROM PSYCHOLOGICAL ILLNESS

Warner Bros.Warner Bros.
by THOMAS D. WILLIAMS, PH.D.3 Apr 201516
The Vatican is offering a course on exorcism—or casting out demons—this April to teach priests and laypeople how to recognize and fight demonic possession.

Sponsored by the Vatican Congregation for the Clergy and organized by the Sacerdos Institute, the weeklong course titled “Exorcism and Prayer of Liberation” will take place at the European University of Rome from April 13 to 18.

This tenth annual edition of the course will consist in a series of meetings aimed at giving priests, doctors, psychologists, teachers, and pastoral workers essential tools on the subject of exorcism, learning how to handle cases of demonic possession and distinguish them from disturbances of a psychological or medical nature.

Speakers for the course include experts from a number of disciplines: psychologists, medical doctors, priests, lawyers, theologians, and, of course, practicing exorcists.

After the international success of past courses, and following Pope Francis’ recurring warnings on the action of the devil, the course is already fully booked.

One of the organizers of the course, Father Pedro Barrajon, told Breitbart that the course is more timely than ever, given the growth of interest in the occult, which can open the door to serious spiritual problems.

Barrajon said that in today’s very secularized society “there is an increased tendency to open the doors to occultism and esotericism.” Diabolical action, he said, “is favored by magical practices and the use of diviners, who may have a real influence in demonic possession.”

The course will address the topic of exorcism both theologically and scientifically, as well as exploring the danger of cults, magic, the occult, Satanism, and nihilism, especially among young people. It will also underscore the exercise of prudence in evaluating each case, to avoid errors that can lead to problems for all involved.

A recent bizarre case involved a 37-year-old Polish priest named Tomas Wieczorek who performed a mass exorcism on a group of school children at a religious camp in north-western Poland. Some of the children became hysterical, others screamed or broke out in laughter.

“This is the sort of thing that should be avoided at all costs,” Barrajon said.

Whereas “the nature of the topic might lend itself to sensationalism,” Barrajon said, the course approaches the topic from “a sound theology” aimed at deepening “the spiritual basis for the action of angels and demons,” flowing from the action of Jesus Christ himself, who is reported by the gospels as “casting out demons.”

The course also offers perspectives from other sciences such as psychology, the law, and medicine.

The course will end with a panel discussion with exorcists Father Francesco Bamonte, Father François Dermine, Father Cesar Truqui, and Brother Benigno Palilla.

Pope Francis has spoken about the devil on numerous occasions, insisting that “he is not a myth” and that “we have to fight him.” The Pope has also blamed divisions among Christians on the devil’s work. During her journey through history, “the Church is tempted by the devil who tries to divide it,” the Pope said, and unfortunately, “she has been marred by serious and painful divisions.”

The modern world, the Pope has said, “was led to believe that the devil was a myth, a picture, an idea, the idea of evil. But the devil exists, and we have to fight him. These are Saint Paul’s words, not mine!”

“The devil,” the Pope went on, “is a liar, the father of lies.”

According to the Catholic Catechism, “Satan or the devil and the other demons are fallen angels who have freely refused to serve God and his plan” (n. 414).

Francis has also praised the work of exorcists, priests dedicated to the work of deliverance and casting out demons.

In a homily last October, the Pope said that Christians need a “shield of faith” because “the devil doesn’t throw flowers at us” but “flaming arrows” to kill us.

Follow Thomas D. Williams on Twitter @tdwilliamsrome


Leave a comment

The Holistic approach for Prevention, controlling and Treatment of Candida Albicans Overgrowth – Healing the intestinal membrane

http://kylejnorton.blogspot.com/2015/03/the-holistic-approach-for-prevention_18.html

Wednesday, 18 March 2015
The Holistic approach for Prevention, controlling and Treatment of Candida Albicans Overgrowth – Healing the intestinal membrane

By Kyle J. Norton Health article writer and researcher; Over 10.000 articles and research papers have been written and published on line, including world wide health, ezine articles, article base, healthblogs, selfgrowth, best before it’s news, the karate GB daily, etc.,.
Named TOP 50 MEDICAL ESSAYS FOR ARTISTS & AUTHORS TO READ by Disilgold.com Named 50 of the best health Tweeters Canada – Huffington Post
Nominated for shorty award over last 4 years
Some articles have been used as references in medical research, such as international journal Pharma and Bio science, ISSN 0975-6299.

What is Candida Albicans
Candida albicans are members of a large group of micro organism whose cells contain complex structures enclosed within the membranes, including yeast(2)(3), fungi(4)(5)(6), and mold(6) that live among the gut flora in the human mouth and gastrointestinal tract. In fact, under normal circumstances, Candida albicans that does not cause harmful effects, but overgrowth results in candidiasis. Non-albicans Candida (NAC) species cause 35-65% of all candidaemias in the general patient population(1). According to joint study, in many cases, biofilm(microorganisms with cells stick to each other on a surface) formation(7) gene mutations(8) and overexpression of genes(9)(10) are often associated with increased Candida resistance toward antifungal agents.

Treatments and controllings

Healing the intestinal membrane
1. L-glutamine
L-glutamine is one of the 20 amino acids encoded by the standard genetic code and used to treat certain gastrointestinal disorders(342)(343) by serving as a source of fuel for the cells that line the gastrointestinal tract. According to Ankara University, L-glutamine inhibited the over growth of candida through its antimutagenic and antimicrobial activities(344).

2. N-acetyl-glucosamine
N-acetyl-glucosamine is a monosaccharide derivative of glucose that supports the digestive track function and maintains healthy intestinal lining by stimulating cell growth in the intestinal track(345). According to 1National Institute of Plant Genome Research, GIG2 (GlcNAc-induced gene 2). involved in the metabolism of N-acetylneuraminate (sialic acid), effectively decrease in fungal burden in mouse model(346).

3. Rice-bran oil
Rice-bran oil, extracted from the germ and inner husk of rice, containing a compound gamma-oryzanol(347) showed to reduce the risk of gastric ulcers caused by stress while at the same time maintaining gastrointestinal motility(348). According to Manipal Academy of Higher Education (Deemed University, rice bran oil immobilized lipase from Candida, a potential pathway for fungal overgrowth(349).

4. Pancreatic enzymes products
Pancreatic enzymes allow for more bacteria to grow in the intestine enabling the food to be digested a lot easier(350). it can be found as supplements and in certain foods. Insufficient pancreatic enzymes can quickly encourage Candida overgrowth the digestive tracts(351).

5. Butyric acid
Butyric acid, a fatty acid occurring in the form of esters in animal fats and plant oils, has found to be effective in inhibited pathogenic organisms(352), improved digestion and promoted intestinal health(353) by producing bacteria to feed on lactic acid, then multiplying and revving up their production(354) . Butyric acid also consists anti-inflammatory property(355) and strengthens the intestinal mucosal barrier.(356).

5. Fructo-oligosaccharides(FOS)
Fructo-oligosaccharides(FOS) is a class of oligosaccharides used as an artificial or alternative sweetener(357), extracted from fruits and vegetables such as bananas, onions, chicory root, garlic, asparagus, barley, wheat, tomatoes, and leeks(358). It is inulin-type prebiotics(359), stimulated the growth of friendly bacteria in the intestine track to counter react to other bad bacteria(360)(362) such as candida but it may cause gas formation, through increasing faecal biomass and water content of the stools, for improvement of bowel habits(361)

6. Etc.

+ References
(1) Non-albicans Candida spp. causing fungaemia: pathogenicity and antifungal resistance by Krcmery V1, Barnes AJ.(PubMed)
(2) Pathogenicity and drug resistance in Candida albicans and other yeast species. A review by Mishra NN1, Prasad T, Sharma N, Payasi A, Prasad R, Gupta DK, Singh R.(PubMed)
(3) Multidrug resistance in yeast Candida by Prasad R1, Kapoor K.(PubMerd)
(4) New evidence that Candida albicans possesses additional ATP-binding cassette MDR-like genes: implications for antifungal azole resistance. by Walsh TJ1, Kasai M, Francesconi A, Landsman D, Chanock SJ.(PubMed)
(5) Mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungal agents in Candida albicans isolates from AIDS patients involve specific multidrug transporters.by Sanglard D1, Kuchler K, Ischer F, Pagani JL, Monod M, Bille J.(PubMed)
(6) Structural analysis of phospho-D-mannan-protein complexes isolated from yeast and mold form cells of Candida albicans NIH A-207 serotype A strain by Shibata N1, Fukasawa S, Kobayashi H, Tojo M, Yonezu T, Ambo A, Ohkubo Y, Suzuki S.(PubMed)
(7) The effect of antifungal combination on transcripts of a subset of drug-resistance genes in clinical isolates of Candida species induced biofilms by Ibrahim NH1, Melake NA2, Somily AM3, Zakaria AS4, Baddour MM5, Mahmoud AZ6(PubMed)
(8) Antifungal drug resistance in pathogenic fungi. by Vanden Bossche H1, Dromer F, Improvisi I, Lozano-Chiu M, Rex JH, Sanglard D.(PubMed)
(9) The genetic basis of fluconazole resistance development in Candida albicans by Morschhäuser J1.(PubMed)
(10) A proteomic approach to understanding the development of multidrug-resistant Candida albicans strains by Kusch H1, Biswas K, Schwanfelder S, Engelmann S, Rogers PD, Hecker M, Morschhäuser J.(PubMed)
(342) Glutamine supplementation for young infants with severe gastrointestinal disease. by Brown JV1, Moe-Byrne T, McGuire W.(PubMed)
(343) Glutamine and intestinal barrier function ,By Wang B1, Wu G, Zhou Z, Dai Z, Sun Y, Ji Y, Li W, Wang W, Liu C, Han F, Wu Z.(PubMed)
(344) Schiff bases attached L-glutamine and L-asparagine: first investigation on antimutagenic and antimicrobial analyses by Sakiyan I1, Anar M, Oğütcü H, Agar G, Sarı N.(PubMed)
(345)Explore The Truth On Cures For Yeast Infection(Thing for Ladies)
(346) and maintains healthy intestinal lining(Thing for Ladies)
(347) Role of gamma-oryzanol in drought-tolerant and susceptible cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.) by Kumar MS, Dahuja A, Rai RD, Walia S, Tyagi A.(PubMed)
(348) [Effects of gamma-oryzanol on gastric lesions and small intestinal propulsive activity in mice].
[Article in Japanese] by Ichimaru Y, Moriyama M, Ichimaru M, Gomita Y.(PubMed)
(349) Hydrolysis of rice bran oil using an immobilized lipase from Candida rugosa in isooctane by Murty VR1, Bhat J, Muniswaran PK.(PubMed)
(350) The use of dual-isotope imaging to compare the gastrointestinal transit of food and pancreatic enzyme pellets in cystic fibrosis patients by Hillel PG1, Tindale WB, Taylor CJ, Frier M, Senior S, Ghosal S.(PubMed)
(351) The Best Digestive Enzymes For Candida(Digestive health Guide)
(352) Purification and characterization of antibacterial substances produced by a marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis strain by Hayashida-Soiza G1, Uchida A, Mori N, Kuwahara Y, Ishida Y.(PubMed)
(353) Induction of rhythmic transient depolarizations associated with waxing and waning of slow wave activity in intestinal smooth muscle by Pawelka AJ1, Huizinga JD2.(PubMed)
(354) Fermentation Analysis & Evaluation(daily one)
(355) Anti-inflammatory effects of sodium butyrate on human monocytes: potent inhibition of IL-12 and up-regulation of IL-10 production by Säemann MD1, Böhmig GA, Osterreicher CH, Burtscher H, Parolini O, Diakos C, Stöckl J, Hörl WH, Zlabinger GJ.(PubMed)
(356) Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase attenuates butyrate-induced intestinal barrier impairment in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model by Huang XZ1, Li ZR, Zhu LB, Huang HY, Hou LL, Lin J.(PubMed)
(357) Functional characterization of sucrose phosphorylase and scrR, a regulator of sucrose metabolism in Lactobacillus reuteri by Teixeira JS1, Abdi R, Su MS, Schwab C, Gänzle MG.(PubMed)
(358) Fructo-oligosaccharides(FOS)(Wikipedia)

(359) [Synthesis of novel fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) by enzymatic reaction].[Article in French]by Grizard D1, Barthomeuf C.(PubMed)
(360) Inulin-type prebiotics–a review: part 1 by Kelly G.(PubMed)
(361) Introducing inulin-type fructans by Roberfroid MB1.(PubMed)
(362) Studies with Inulin-Type Fructans on Intestinal Infections, Permeability, and Inflammation,
by Francisco Guarner(The Journal of Nutrition)


Leave a comment

Tips For Eating Healthy on a Budget

http://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/health/2014/05/29/eating-healthy-on-a-budget/

Tips For Eating Healthy on a Budget
by Napala Pratini on May 29, 2014 | posted in Healthy Living, Wellness
5 Tips to Eat Healthy on a Budget

In our increasingly on-the-go world and with the temptation of cheap fast food lurking around what seems like every street corner, eating healthy can be a major challenge, even if doing so comes with multiple benefits. Eight out of 10 Americans say they eat fast food monthly, and about half said they eat it at least weekly, according to a Gallup poll last year. While eating fast food might seem more affordable in the short term, eating nutritious food certainly doesn’t have to break the bank. Here are some tips to help keep your wallet fat while keeping your waistline thin.

NerdWallet’s Top Tips for Lowering Your Medical Bills
Compare your Explanation of Benefits against your medical bill to check for mistakes.
Appeal any denied claims and negotiate your bill.
Apply for financial aid from the hospital, a charity, or even crowdfund your bill.
Still need help? Call us at (800) 503-5404 or
sign up here for a free consultation with a medical billing expert.
Budget and plan out your week

We’ve all been there: Walking through the grocery store on an empty stomach, shoving everything in sight into the cart. But shopping with a full belly, plus a plan in mind, can help prevent you from overspending and buying unhealthy items. An hour or two before heading to the grocery store, sit down, create a grocery budget and make a list of groceries you’ll need for the week. When planning, search for recipes online while cross-checking them with your store’s weekly fliers to see what’s on sale. When you go the store, avoid temptation by staying out of the aisles that don’t include items on your list.

Buy in season — and in bulk

When making your grocery list, consider the fruits and vegetables that are currently in season. Seasonal produce is usually plentiful and less expensive than produce that isn’t in season. Try to stay away from already sliced and prepared fruits and vegetables, which may be more convenient, but also are often more expensive. When shopping, consider what you buy often and buy in bulk. If an item you eat frequently is on sale, like boneless chicken or ground turkey, consider buying more than you need for the week, and freeze what you don’t use. Similarly, for produce you use often, a larger amount could be a better buy.

Prepare meals ahead of time

Prepping ahead of time can help stop you from making unhealthy food choices in a rush. Set aside one day a week to prepare your meals in advance. This will ensure you’ll have healthy meals waiting in the fridge and help save time during the week. When searching for meals to prepare, look for recipes such as stews or casseroles to make the fresh, healthy ingredients you’ve purchased stretch further. When cooking over the weekend, try doubling the recipe and freezing individual-portion sizes for weekday lunches or dinners.

Limit eating out

It can be hard to resist the temptation of dining out, especially at the office when co-workers are heading out for lunch. The average American eats lunch out twice a week, and spends about $10 each time, which adds up to an average of about $936 a year, according to a survey by Visa. If possible, it’s better to avoid dining out altogether. If you just need to get away from your desk for a while, consider having your packed lunch alfresco or taking a quick stroll around the block — your mind and body will thank you.

If you can’t always cut back on dining out, seek out restaurants with healthy options and regular lunch specials. Stick to water instead of sugary drinks, which can add to the bill and your waistline.

Grow your own

If you have the space, starting a garden of your own can be a great way to save money on produce. Seeds or small plants cost just a few dollars and produce fruits and vegetables all season long. Depending on your region, plants like tomatoes, lettuce or cucumbers can be grown in containers on your porch or balcony. When choosing what to plant, look at what you purchase most often, as well as what grows in your region. By having nutritious options in your own backyard, this will help ensure healthy eating. Plus, is there anything more rewarding than preparing food you’ve grown on your own?


Leave a comment

Tulsi Gabbard, Dem Hawaii: Iraq War Vet Dem Congresswoman Shoots Down Obama’s ISIS Jobs Claim

http://www.frontpagemag.com/2015/dgreenfield/iraq-war-vet-dem-congresswoman-shoots-down-obamas-isis-jobs-claim/#.VOdSYMA1fig.twitter

Iraq War Vet Dem Congresswoman Shoots Down Obama’s ISIS Jobs Claim
February 20, 2015 by Daniel Greenfield 13 Comments
634816
Print This Post Print This Post
abc_tulsi_gabbard_this_week_jt_130622_wblog

It’s a sign of how badly the Democratic Party has been hollowed out and steered to the left that there isn’t even a Dem Senator anymore to make a moderate argument about fighting terrorism.

It falls to, of all things, a Democratic Congresswoman from Hawaii to be her party’s lone voice of reason.

Representative and Iraq War veteran Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) argued the White House’s summit on violent extremism was “a diversion from what our real focus needs to be, and that focus is on this Islamic extremist threat” on Wednesday’s “Your World with Neil Cavuto” on the Fox News Channel.

“Unless you accurately identify who your enemy is, then you can’t come up with an effective strategy, a winning strategy to defeat that enemy. My concern here with the summit that’s happening right now in Washington is that it really is a diversion from what our real focus needs to be, and that focus is on this Islamic extremist threat that is posed not only to the United States and the American people, but around the world. From what we’ve heard so far, the administration is really claiming that the motivation or the — the thing that’s fueling this terrorism, around the world, is something that has to do with poverty, has to do with a lack of jobs, or lack of access to education, really a materialistic motivation. And therefore, they are proposing that the solution must be to alleviate poverty around the world, to continue this failed Bush and Obama policy of nation building. The danger here is, again, that you’re not identifying the threat, and you’re not identifying the fact that they are not fueled by a materialistic motivation, it’s actually a theological, this radical Islamic ideology that is allowing them to continue to recruit, that is allowing them to continue to grow in strength and really that’s really fueling these horrific terrorist activities around the world” she said.

You’re now hearing this argument breaking out into left-of-center media outlets like Vox and The Atlantic. But nearly no Dem in Congress is willing to stand up and state something as simple and common sense as this for fear of undermining Obama.

It’s like they have to protect their Chamberlain from reality by driving all the way off the cliff.

Filed Under: The Point
About Daniel Greenfield

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.
Sponsored From Around the Web